Tuesday








Conference 9

June 5-7, 2015, in Provincetown 

Sunday

Keynote Speaker: Pavel Zoubok

Owner of the Chelsea gallery that bears his name, Pavel Zoubok is a warm and intelligent gallerist with a dedication to collage and its various forms. "Wax certainly lends itself to collage," Pavel has noted in conversation. While several of the gallery artists incorporate wax or encaustic in their practice--including Judy Pfaff and Donna Sharrett--it is the collage form in general that Pavel will address. We think you will relate, as so many of you work with gathering, assemblilng and layering, often with materials that go beyond wax.  We cannot imagine anyone more suited to address the topic than the man with a brilliant eye for the marvelous melange.


Pavel surrounded by his artists' work

"Perhaps no art form expresses the character of the twentieth century and the contemporary moment with greater clarity and immediacy than collage."



Judy Pfaff mixed-media installation at the gallery now through November 15
Image from the gallery website; photo by Bodycomb Studio, NYC


Donna Sharrett, Praise You, 2003-05, mixed media on wax-covered box, 18 x 18 inches
Image from the gallery website


Here's how Pavel describes his gallery's program: 

"Since 1997, Pavel ZoubokGallery has specialized in collage, assemblage and mixed-media Installation. From the outset, the gallery’s program has presented modern and contemporary works in an effort to create a cohesive art historical context for collage and its related forms, spanning most of the major art movements of the postwar period. While the primary market has always been a driving force of our program, represented by a diverse group of gallery artists, we maintain an inventory of works by important proponents of the medium, including Hannelore Baron, Joe Brainard, Joseph Cornell, Al Hansen, Ray Johnson, Jiri Kolar, Mimmo Rotella, Anne Ryan, Jacques Villeglé and David Wojnarowicz. 

"Since the gallery’s 2004 relocation to the heart of Chelsea, we make a regular practice of publishing exhibition catalogues collaborating with numerous scholars and critics including Alexander Andersen-Spivy, Dan Cameron, Edward Gomez, Robert Hobbs, Charlotta Kotik, Carlo McCormick, Robert Rosenblum and Dickran Tashjian.  Our audience continues to broaden and we continue to develop relationships with institutions.  Museum associations have included Wadsworth Atheneum of Art, Brooklyn Museum, Katonah Museum of Art, New Britain Museum of American Art, Newark Museum, Norton Museum of Art, and others. In addition to our stated focus, we have also maintained a tangential but related interest in Surrealism, establishing an inventory of works by artists such as Max Ernst, Yves Tanguy, Roberto Matta, George Hugnet, Kay Sage and Stella Snead. In 2009, Pavel Zoubok Gallery was made a member of the ADAA (Art Dealer's Association of America)."  

Registration Is Underway

Registration has begun. We expect to have 200+ conferees this year. You'll register via the Castle Hill website with a credit card. It's a fast and easy process. 

Earlybird special is $425 until November 15.

This years presenters and last year's award winners: Please Call Castle Hill to register: 508-349-7511

Schedule of fees after November 15
. November 16-January 1: $475
. January 2-May 14: $550
. May 15-June 4: $650
. At the door: $650




If you're interested in Pre- or Post-Conference workshops, the full selection is here, along with information about the workshop and our distinguished faculty. You can register for the Workshops by phone.

Saturday

Saturday Morning Panel

Professional Practices: The Big Picture!

Our Saturday Morning Conference Panel this year is big: six panelists. We have a big panel because our topic is big: all the issues you need to know to develop and/or refine your visibility as an artist. Some of the topics we'll address: the artist/dealer relationship (and what's going on in a dealer's mind about your request to show work), everything you need to know about juried shows, getting on a curator or editor’s radar and following through, dealing with critical feedback, understanding referrals and courtesies. In short, we demystify the art world and help you understand how to create a professional presence--as well as being what Chuck Close calls  "a good art world citizen." We'll have three hours (minus a break and a stretch), and that the time will go by like that! 
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Our panelsts come with significant educational and professional achievements, a testament to the deep well of talent within our own ranks. 


Miles Conrad is the founding director of the Conrad WildeGallery. Since 2005 his gallery has hosted innovative multimedia programs in TucsonArizona, and at international art fairs in MiamiNew York City, and Los Angeles. Inclusion in his Annual Encaustic Invitational has been a milestone for many members of this community. Miles teaches and lectures on professional practices and gives individual career consultations to artists, which he describes as “a grad school style crit meets motivational coach meets accountability/support group.” Miles holds an MFA from the San Francisco Art Institute.



Fanne Fernow was born in Buffalo, moving to Massachusetts and then to Santa Cruz, California. After profound experiences working as a journalist, AIDS activist and teacher, she moved to Santa Cruz to pursue life as a full-time artist. She has studied world religions and ethics at Episcopal Divinity School and Harvard University, and art at Hamilton College, Clinton, New York; Mount Holyoke College, South Hadley, Massachusetts; and the San Francisco Art Institute. Fanne has shown her work all over the United States and been published in numerous publications, print and digital.With her study of ethics and her involvement in the encaustic community, Fanne is uniquely suited to address some of the difficult growing pains we've experienced in the group dynamic.


Marci Rae McDade is editor of the contemporary textile-arts quarterly, Surface Design Journal, and former editor of FiberArts magazine. In addition to her editorial pursuits, she is a mentor and instructor in the MFA Applied Craft + Design Program, co-sponsored by the Oregon College of Art and Craft and the Pacific Northwest College of Art, Portland, Oregon. Marci received an MFA in fiber and material studies from the School of the Art Institute of Chicago, completed a Fiber Emerging Artist Residency at the Oregon College of Art and Craft, and received a BA in film and video production from Columbia College Chicago. As a practicing fiber artist, she has exhibited her embroidered art and multi-media fiber installations nationally in solo and group exhibitions since 2000.


Timothy McDowell received his MFA from the University of Arizona in 1981. Since then he has been a professor of printmaking and drawing at Connecticut College in New London, Connecticut.  Over the years, he has concentrated on several mediums. For the last 20 he has worked primarily in encaustic as well as oils, producing paintings, prints and works on paper. His work has been exhibited nationally and internationally with representation in the U.S. and Canada. Collections include The Metropolitan Museum of Art Print and Drawing Collection, The University of Iowa Museum of Art, The New Mexico Museum of Art, the Tucson Museum of Art and others. Tim was a panelist at Conference 1 in 2007, when the topic was Encaustic: State of the Art.


Jane Allen Nodine is Assistant Chair of Fine Arts and Communication Studies at the University of South Carolina Upstate where she is Professor of Art and director of the Curtis R. Harley Gallery. Recognized with numerous awards, Jane received an NEA/SECCA Southeastern Seven IV Fellowship from the Southeastern Center for Contemporary Art and two South Carolina Arts Commission Artist Fellowships. In 2012 she received the Award for Outstanding Artistic Achievement by the Southeastern College Art Conference, and in 2002 she was awarded a Belle W. Baruch Visiting Scholar Fellowship to Hobcaw Barony Plantation in Georgetown, S.C. Jane’s work is included in numerous collections. Her career spans several decades, and in 1999 she was selected by the South Carolina State Museum and the South Carolina Arts Commission as one of the One Hundred Most Significant Artists in South Carolina During the 20th Century. 


Carol Pelletier is the Chair of Fine Arts and Professor of Art at Endicott College, Beverly, Massachusetts. Carol has worked on multiple invitational and curatorial projects, including Organic to Geometric: Investigations in Surface and Structure at Endicott College. She has exhibited in over 50 solo and group shows nationwide, including the Attleboro Art Museum, the Huntington Museum of Art, the Oglebay Institute, Berea College,  and Marietta College. She has received three National Endowment for the Arts Grants, a Mellon Foundation grant, and is a Salzburg Fellow. Her work has been in multiple catalogue exhibitions and publications including New American Paintings. She is represented by the River Gallery in Chattanooga, Tennessee, and Cynthia Winings Gallery in Blue Hill, Maine.

 

Joanne Mattera will moderate. A gallery-represented artist, author, art blogger and occasional curator, Joanne has maintained a studio practice since 1970. She holds an MA in visual art from Goddard College. Joanne is the founder/director of The Encaustic Conference.

Tuesday

Sunday Afternoon Panel

It is no secret that the popularity of encaustic has increased at a rapid rate over the last decade. Art centers, schools, independent workshops, books, DVD’s and YouTube videos are disseminating vast quantities of information about the medium to a growing number of interested students and professional artists.  Who makes up this teaching and learning community? What kinds of lessons are being taught? What is the significance for the future of encaustic and its practitioners? 

These and other questions will be explored in our 2015 panel on Standards and Practices in Teaching Encaustic. We’ll combine the information that’s been collected during previous conference sessions with recent studies that poll arts educators from a range of sources to provide you with a look at the current state of encaustic instruction. Join us for an open dialogue after we share the latest findings on encaustic education today. 

Milisa Galazzi's artwork highlights human relationships punctuated by physical distance or separation by time, and she is best known for her large scale installations, works on paper, and conceptual paintings. Milisa holds an MA with Honors from the Rhode Island School of Design, where she researched the educational effectiveness of community-based art education settings, and her findings are published by Harvard University Graduate School of Education, Project Zero Press, 1999; in addition, she holds a BA from Brown University, where she studied Studio Art with minors in Women’s Studies and Cultural Anthropology—all of which directly inform the content of her art making. Milisa works full time in her studio in Providence and on Cape Cod in the summer months.

Sara Mast is a widely exhibited artist whose paintings are included in over 30 public and private collections in the United States and abroad. Her work is included in Joanne Mattera’s book, The Art of Encaustic Painting. Recent exhibitions include Soundings, a collaborative exhibition at the Ucross Foundation in ClearmontWyoming;  As Above, So Below, a solo exhibition at Rosenfeld Gallery in Philadelphia; and Repertoire, a group exhibition at Zolla/Lieberman Gallery in Chicago. Currently, she is working on a collaborative project with physicists entitled Black (W)hole, an art installation that was was recently selected for inclusion in R & F's Encaustic Works: A Curated Exhibition in Print, curated by Michelle Stuart. Sara lives and works in BozemanMontana, and co-chairs the Drawing & Painting department at Montana State University.

Cherie Mittenthal has her MFA from the State University of New York at Purchase and her BFA from the Hartford Art School at the University of Hartford. She is the Executive Director of Truro Center for the Arts at Castle Hill since 2002. Cherie serves on the board of Campus Provincetown, Provincetown Cultural Council, and partners with Highlands Center Inc. for the only Wood-Fired Kiln on Cape Cod. Cherie’s paintings and work on paper are redolent of the meeting of sky, sand and sea, and sometimes animals, from crows to pigs and sheep. In her studio practice she works in pigment sticks, mixed media, and encaustic. Her work is represented by Kobalt Gallery in Provincetown. She is the co-producer of the International Encaustic Conference in Provincetown.

TobySisson earned her M.F.A. from the University of Minnesota, Twin Cities, and is an Assistant Professor of Studio Art and Director of the Schiltkamp Gallery at Clark University in Worcester, Massachusetts. In addition to her individual works in painting and printmaking, Toby’s areas of specialization include collaborative public art and community-based service learning. She has been the recipient of numerous awards and grants for her studio practice as well as excellence in teaching. Among her academic research projects, she studies the development of dialogic critique methods for students and professional artists. She currently lives and works in Providence, Rhode Island

Monday

Conference Events

Do we have great events for you! The only problem will be choosing which one you wish to attend each hour. Fontunately you have plenty of time to decide. While Conference registration is taking place now--secure that Earlybird rate before November 15!--event selection will not take place until January 2015.

Event Descriptions and Presenter Bios are now posted. Here's the Conference schedule (click each page to enlarge for legibility):






Saturday

Event Descriptions

Our demos and talks this year are broad and diverse, reflecting your expansive range of experiences and interests.  As you are considering events for selection—one per event hour—please note how they are grouped:

. Basics: For those new to encaustic, we have a series on Friday that introduces you to the basics of painting and fusing, making monotypes, and thinking about the content and intent of your work. If you’re unsure of what you’ve learned in the past, or wish to brush up with different teachers, this is the series for you. Select one event or all, as you feel you need.
. Professional Issues: For those with an active studio practice, the focus is not so much on how to make the work as how to get it out into the world. We’re offering talks throughout the three days that offer the kind of professional leg up that most artists find only with a mentor.
. General interest demos and talks: Between beginner and professional are demos and talks designed to interest artists working at all levels of engagement. We encourage beginners to sign up for talks that help you think about the why of your work as well as the how. And we encourage everyone to think about new processes and ideas to expand your practice. 

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Friday 
9:30--10:30
Demo: Basics: Introduction to Encaustic
Deborah Winiarski
This demonstration will focus on encaustic painting basics, as well as how to easily and inexpensively incorporate painting with wax into a studio practice.  Equipment and tools, encaustic medium recipes, pigmenting options, painting supports and grounds will be addressed. Several fusing options will be demonstrated. Various techniques to create texture and line will be demonstrated, as well as ways to introduce imagery to a work with transfers and rice papers. Basic studio safety and ventilation will be discussed.
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Talk: Depth and Dimensionality in Encaustic
Joan Stuart Ross
One of the great physical attributes of wax is its optical depth. In this talk, Joan will emphasize the “physical, implied and intellectual depth” in work by a number of accomplished artists, including Patti Bowman, Karen Freedman, Lorraine Glessner, Jef Gunn, Holly Ballard Martz, Wayne Montecalvo, and Joan Stuart Ross herself.
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Talk: Professional Issues: In the Eyes of a Curator
Deborah Kapoor
Deborah will share a video presentation of her interview with Andrea Karnes,  a curator at The Modern Art Museum of Fort Worth, Texas.  What are the responsibilities of a curator? How do curators select work for exhibitions? What is the process of acquisitioning works for a collection? What does curating entail? Aspects of the curatorial process will be demystified in this session, followed by a discussion about curating.
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11:30--12:30

Demo: Basics: Fusing with Torches, Irons, Heat Guns
Lynette Haggard
If you are new to encaustic, this is an essential demonstration, as Lynette will present the three tool types and show which is best used for the specific task at hand. After going over general safety tips and practices with these tools, she’ll demonstrate fusing with each, contrasting some of the differences between tools.  Her demo will include using the iron for smooth surface, and the tacking iron for smaller collage work;  the range and shape of various flames used in torch “heat brushes”; and working toward a smooth surface with a heat gun.  Even if you’re not a beginner, this is a good opportunity to revisit your fusing options—and to get over your fear of the torch.
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Demo: Layering Images
Wayne Montecalvo
While collage is typically the layering and embedding of materials, Wayne’s demo will focus on the layering of images—a mutilayered “sandwich” in which image assumes primacy.  Although the images are on various materials, the idea is how to develop a compositon through multiple images. Says Wayne: “The idea could be applied to printed material, drawn material, watercolor and other markmaking options outside the realm of direct painting with encaustic.”
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Talk: An International View of Encaustic
Elena De La Ville

“For the last six months, I have been working on a comprehensive listing of international artists who work in wax,” says Elena. She continues continue to talk with artists from around the world, gathering information from artists and instructors who work in encaustic, and schools where it is taught. This international view of the medium--by a multilingual artist who has lived, worked and exhibited internationally--is perfectly suited to a Conference that continues to draw artist from around the world. 
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Talk: Professional Issues: Projecting Change into Your Work
Cat Crotchett

In the spring of 2014, Cat received a grant for a project entitled, Giving Pattern Dimension: A Study in Encaustic Painting.  This ongoing project involves researching and combining Indonesian textile patterns, processes and tools with encaustic painting and silk screen in three-dimensional relief. “This talk is about the changes that will occur in my work as I progress through this project,” says Cat, describing it as a “Studio Confidential’” that will document her experiments, learning experiences, successes and turning points that will lead to a new body of work for a solo exhibition scheduled for Fall 2015. Relatedly it will allow Cat to discuss how we, as visual artists, push ourselves, and our work past our comfort zone.
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1:30--2:30
Demo: Basics: Tips From a Pro
Tracy Spadafora
OK, so you know the basics, but what you want are the smart ways of doing things, gleaned from years of experience. Tracy has them for you.  An artist and teacher for over 20 years, Tracy will address materials (how to make medium efficiently and without the schmutz; the best sources for wax); equipment (the tools to give you specific and desired results); techniques (everything from combining oil and wax to dealing with edges and sides; to achieving a smooth surface); as well as the issues in the care and shipping of your work. Take advantage of years’ worth of experience—Tracy’s and others’.
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Demo: Wax, Plate, Print: Making an Encaustic Collagraph
Dorothy Cochran
"The fluid nature of this collagraph method is appealing for the diversity of its printed outcome," says Dorothy. In the spirit of experimentation, she will demonstrate many ways of applying wax on a plexiglass substrate using gestural brush work, stamping of found objects, embedding textures, linear drawing with hot tools, and free-flow pouring. The resulting surface can be further carved, incised, heated or removed as the image is developed.  Additional techniques will include tape and stencils for precise geometry and image definition.  Resulting plates have the potential of being printed both as intaglio or relief, layered with each other or combined with print methods such as monotype, etching and drypoint. There will be many samples of plates and prints pulled from that matrix in addition to the actual demonstration.
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Talk: Body and Wax: The Contemporary Encaustic Figure
Dan Addington
“When looking at the way contemporary artists have approached the figure via the medium of wax, I believe we see much of the work locate itself in one of two categories,” says Dan. He will  present a selected group of current practitioners loosely divided into two groups: wax as a descriptive medium of occupied space, and wax as metaphor for flesh. As a descriptive medium, painters engage encaustic’s ability to describe atmosphere, which evokes space through which the figure is viewed. As a metaphor for flesh, he’ll include sculptors as well as painters who focus on the material qualities of wax in a way that evokes the skin and form of the body. He’ll talk about such artists as Tony Scherman, Mona Shahid and Kiki Smith as well as a number of conferees who are working in a figurative mode.
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Talk: Professional Issues: The Artist Residency
Ruth Hiller

Thinking about applying for an artist residency? After recently completing a month-long residency, Ruth realized that she had a lot to share with others who might be thinking about one. “One size does not fit all,” she says. Her presentation will cover various aspects of artist residencies: types available (some you pay for, others pay you a stipend), and how to choose the one that’s right for you. She’ll share the experiences of other artists as well as her own, and provide resources for those who are inspired to run right out and apply.
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3:00--4:00

Interactive Talk: Basics: Tools to Inspire You
Judy Klich
“As creative beings we sometimes lose our way.  We allow our inner critique, the opinions of others or just life to get in the way of our true calling--to be creative, to have joy in our own self-expression and to share it with the world,” says Judy. This session is designed to give you that spark back!  Judy will take you through basic to get you inspired and feel creative. You’ll do individual hands on exercises as well as group interaction. You will leave with a whole list of tools to get you reenergized and rediscover what inspires you to be an artist. Bring a sketchbook.
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Demo: Mixed-Media Printmaking: Collagraph and Photopolymer
Jeff Hirst

Want to expand your printmaking options? Jeff’s demo combines mixing photopolymer plates and encaustic collagraph processes.  Imagery created is an interesting mix of graphic-oriented, photo-based work with more lyrical collagraph work.  The demo will cover multiplate color printing using a magnetic system that he uses in his teaching which alkows even an inexperienced printmaker to register multi-plate images. The process is entirely nontoxic.
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Talk: It Begins with a Mark
Lorraine Glessner

“Marks are the building blocks of any work of art and can be achieved through a wide variety of methods and materials,” says Lorraine. Her talk will explore contemporary artists’ marks through the categories of line and gesture, process, response, and technology. The innovative concept of the found drawing--drawing that arises as a by-product, rather than any formal process—will also be introduced and discussed. Contemporary artists working in the disciplines of painting, printmaking, crafts, fiber, sculpture and installation will be examined in their unique approaches to the mark. Utilizing familiar materials and processes such as smoke, fire, stitch, beeswax, found and industrial materials, the marks can serve as both the foundation of content to the content itself.
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Talk: Professional Issues: Raising the Bar: Concept to Matter
Alexandre Masino

Rooted in what he calls "the ecosystem of the studio," Alexandre’s presentation aims at broadening our horizons and shaking off the stereotypes. The goal is to focus both on the technical and conceptual aspects required to achieve a personal vision and to anchor it in the material of our choice: encaustic. “As artists we should always and constantly raise our own bar in order to deepen our vision and practice," says Alexandre. Starting with the initial idea and intent, he will follow the research involved in producing a new series. Then he'll shift the focus to the technical aspects of working with encaustic: painting, monotype and monoprint. Presenting the dialogue between these approaches, he will offer technical information: how to work large, the advantages of using an easel to achieve expressive markmaking, why using double-boilers, fan brush handling, sketching techniques, indirect drawing, fusing tools, Intaglio printing and more.
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4:30--5:30
Demo: Basics: Creating Encaustic Monotypes
Pat Spainhour
This demo might be subtitled HotBox Basics. What is a Hotbox? How do you create encaustic monotypes? What kinds of papers do you use? This class is for those who are curious about the basic process of creating a monotype on the Roland HotBox. The basics of printing on a Hotbox and a variety of techniques will be shown. This is an exciting demo for those new to encaustic, as well as those looking for ways to take their practice in a new direction or to the next level. 
Demo: Crossing Borders: Painting with Encaustic on Paper
Raé Miller
Painting on paper offers freedom to work quickly and lightly, whether you’re at a residency and don’t wish to be encumbered with the bulkiness of panels, or you simply want the option of painting with encaustic on a lighter substrate with the optical effect of many layers created from just a few. Working with translucent encaustic on watercolor paper, Raé will show how to use encaustic gesso to keep the wax from bleeding under the masked borders of a painting, how to make marks in the wax with handmade stamps and objects from nature to give depth to the layers, and how to fuse with a torch or a heat gun on paper. She’ll demonstrate methods of masking borders and layers. This is a way to achieve the visual depth artists are often seeking in their work—and it’s an appoach you could translate to panel if you wish.
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Talk: Cannibalism and The Art of Collage
Tracey Adams

How does an artists working in collage find ideas, materials and meaning? All of the fragments Tracey uses in her collages are derived from encaustic monotypes, drawings and small pieces of her intaglio prints.  Says Tracey, “I ‘cannibalize’ most of my large scroll installations (encaustic monotypes), after they are in deinstalled from various museum installations.“ She’ll talk about some of her finished collages, discussing how and why she chooses certain fragments for collage, “this being what defines my process and style.”  
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Talk: Professional Issues: The Studio Continuum
Laura Moriarty
Laura subtitles this talk, “Being inspired and keeping your work moving forward.”  Artists are commonly asked about their inspiration. It comes up so often that, after a number of years, we hone and temper our response to make it more easy to understand, (or, if dealing with the press, more difficult to mess-up.) But we all know that inspiration works on many levels and these blurbs and statements only scratch the surface of what motivates us in the studio. This audience-involved presentation is designed to be an open conversation among artists about being in the flow of the studio. Says Laura, “We will begin with a brief slide show, then we will open it up to the floor beginning with guided questions. Whether you come to share or just to listen, all will have an opportunity to consider the myriad ways artists keep the fire burning.”
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Saturday
9:30—12:30
Panel: Professional Practices: The Big Picture!
This is an opportunity for beginners and encaustic newbies to understand and envision what’s possible, and for more seasoned artists to forge a plan based on the professional advice offered.
Read more here.

1:30—2:30
Demo: Cold Composition in Encaustic Printmaking
David A. Clark
David will show you how to expand the possibilities of encaustic printing by going from cold to hot. Manipulating the process to “compose cold” and then introduce heat to activate the paint and print the image can assist you with registration and composition. Moreover, it will give you time to build an image, to think through your ideas without having to work fast, which is typically a characteristic of printing with encaustic.
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Talk: Color theory: Itten’s and Albers’s Interaction of Color
Pamela Blum
Pamela calls this talk, “How ColorsPush Each Other Around Like Naughty Children on a Playground." The moment we perceive a color it begins to change. Perception of color is always relative, contextual.  Our eyes’ rods (value receptors) and cones (color receptors) vary in number. We can’t remember a color. So how do our eyes, brains and surface colors interact? This session will demonstrate how. The session is for artists who have not studied color interaction or who would like a refresher. An artist who understands color interaction finds it easier to get desired color results, to control color and the cost of paint. This session uses Itten’s color terms and Albers’ color studies to demonstrate color interaction. While looking at color interactions, session attendees will practice verbalizing the elements and principles of color interaction.
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Talk: Photographing Your Work
Patti Russotti
In a reprise of her talk at Conference 7, Patti will survey the different options and methods for photographing your work as well as provide a brief demo illustrating the results of a do-it-yourself photo studio. When should you photograph work yourself and when should you hire a professional? How do images differ when photographed with a smart phone, a point-and-shoot, and an SLR? What kinds of lights will give you a professional quality? What do you need to know about formats and software? How much photo geekiness do you need to get professional results? Join Patti, associate professor in the School of Photographic Arts and Sciences at Rochester Institute of Technology, to see and discuss your options as an artist.

3:00—4:30
Note: This is a 90-minute session
Demo: Pigment Wizardry: Special Effects
Gregory Wright
For those of you who loved Greg’s Patterned Effects from previous years—as well as those who are looking to mix materials safely—Greg will show the varied uses of pigments (powdered, aqua-dispersion, and metallic). He’ll show techniques such as coloring encaustic gesso, mixing pigments with various solvents (including water, alcohol, and shellac), enhancing manufactured encaustic paints, creating your own encaustic paint, enhancing texture and relief with powdered pigments. As always, he will focus on the safe handling of these products, working with a torch, as well as studio safety, safe practices, and ventilation. And he’ll encourage you on how to incorporate these techniques into your personal style. This demo is not for beginners
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Demo: Markmaking and Encaustic with Mixed Media
Lisa Pressman
“This demo will cover some of my favorite materials and techniques that help create interesting and eventually personal markmaking systems,” says Lisa. She’ll begin with transparent layers of medium and demonstrate the various materials and tools she uses to achieve a richness of surface with drawing techniques, pan pastels, ink, pigment sticks, and more. This demo is for artists at all levels who maybe looking for new ways to approach painting and markmaking with encaustic. Plan to come to this demo with a basic understanding of encaustic terms and processes.
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Talk: From There to Here: Forty Years as a Feminist Artist
Nancy Youdelman 
The first part Nancy’s slide talk will include her experience as a student in Judy Chicago’s revolutionary feminist art class (the first in the nation) that she developed and taught at Fresno State in 1970-71 and continued to teach with Miriam Schapiro when they developed the Feminist Art Program at CalArts, 1971-73. “I have some fascinating images of artwork/performance we did from that time, including Womanhouse,” says Nancy. The second half of her talk will follow the process of evolution to her current work and her use of encaustic.

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Sunday
1:30—3:00
Note: This is a 90-minute session
Panel: Raising the Bar: Standards and Practices in Teaching Encaustic
Milisa Galazzi, Sara Mast, Cherie Mittenthal and Tobi Sisson—two college/university professors and two school directors, artists all—meet for the fourth Conference in a row to address the issues of teaching encaustic. Whether you are a student or a teacher—or if you’re thinking of teaching—this panel is not to be missed. Read more here.

Demo: Graphite, Carbon and Wax
Paula Roland
“Similar to beeswax, carbon materials may bring meaning to art made with it, helping to cultivate and deepen the artist’s ideas,” says Paula, who has long used these materials in her own practice. Paula will demonstrate many ways of using powdered graphite—as well as India ink, carbon black and soot black pigments, and other carbon materials—with wax. Graphite on wax produces unusual effects when layered, fused with a heat lamp, made into a paint with alcohol, dry-rubbed into waxy surfaces, and transferred to wax and fused. Paula will also show you how to use graphite with stencils and as drawings and frottage (rubbings) to transfer to wax. Carbon inks form a skin over encaustic which can break apart and seem animated when the wax is heated. Other carbon/wax techniques shown include the use of tools, brushes and candle soot (fumage) to create marks and atmosphere.

Demo: Working Sculpturally with Fiber and Encaustic
Susan Lasch Krevitt
Known for her sculptural use of fiber and wax, Susan will focus in this demonstration on deconstructed garments as a source of textile elements for use with encaustic. You’ll learn a variety of ways to explore and manipulate fabric for the creation of sculpture or relief work that can be attached to a panel. Susan will advise on options to consider: fiber content, color, and the ‘hand’ of the fabric. She’ll have sample boards available to illustrate a sculptural range of possibilities through the use of various fabrics.
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Talk: Professional Issues: Get Organized! Six Things Every Professional Artist Needs to Know
Karen Freedman
We know organization is a pain so you often let things slide, but it’s essential to a smooth-running studio and a well-oiled career. Karen, who has been known to say, “Precision? I eat it for breakfast,” will help you get your career in order: Know Yourself (how to adapt Karen’s suggestions to your own working style); Time Management (yes, you can be more efficient), Organizing Your Computer (setting up file system, updating resume, statement, etc); Documenting Your Artwork (photography, forms, templates); Record Keeping (inventory, tracking, provenance); Finances (bookkeeping). 
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3:30—4:30
Demo: The Perfect Pour
Sherrie Posternak
There are many reasons you might want a perfectly smooth surface. One of the most useful applications of a poured layer of encaustic medium is to prepare a smooth surface for accepting a detailed transferred image. However you will use a smooth top layer, Sherrie will explain and demonstrate the materials and techniques necessary to make a successful poured surface.
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Interactive Talk: Beyond Basics: Finding Meaning in Your Work
Binnie Birstein
How can beginning painters bring their work to the next level? In this interactive talk,  Binnie will provide a guideline for finding meaning in your work—how you can move from experimenting with techniques to creating paintings with intention. “I am not going to talk about the physical aspects of painting,” says Binnie, “but about looking at art: recognizing what draws you in, identifying themes in painting, thinking about your work from the experience of making, experimenting with various styles of painting, working in series, discovering influences in other works of art.”  Discussion will follow a brief slide talk.
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Talk: What Sticks to Encaustic? 
Richard Frumess
"With more and more artists pushing the envelope of mixed media, it becomes ever more important to have structured comparative testing of how those different media hold together…or don’t," says Richard. In Conference 7, Richard talked about what happens when you paint encaustic over different kinds of surfaces such as wood, metal, Plexiglas, encaustic gesso, and acrylic gesso. This year, he’ll talk about what happens when you apply different kinds of paint onto encaustic. He will present test results of how well oil paint, oil stick, acrylic, alkyd, casein, and egg tempera adhere to wax.  If you work in mixed media, or if you teach, you will want to learn the results of Richard’s testing.
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Talk: Encaustic Safety: Materials, Studio, Fire, Ventilation
Patricia Dusman
After a career working in labs and hospitals, and with many hours of workplace safety training, Patricia is uniquely qualified to address the subject of safety in the encaustic studio. As an artist and a scientist, she knows that while encaustic shares many dangers with other media, it also has its unique challenges. The goal of the talk is to provide a resource for artists who want to learn how to work safely, who want to confirm that they are working safely, or who may be already working safely but want to improve their individual situations. She’ll show examples of safe and unsafe studio set ups, along with a show-and-tell about safety options like vent hoods, fans, fire extinguishers, dust masks, gloves, and an easy-to-make glove box.

Friday

Presenter Bios

The Encaustic Conference is so much more than one person. As we do each year, we have gathered an extraordinary array of presenters whose qualifications as artists and instructors are unmatched. Our presenters are degreed professors at the college/university level or experienced entrepreneurial teachers with large followings of dedicated students; many are "artist hypnenates," adding paintmaker, gallerist, curator, author, or art blogger to their practice. They show regularly, nationally and internationally, at museums and galleries. Many are gallery represented. All bring to their teaching years of studio practice and a deep understanding of encaustic in contemporary art.

Tracey Adams completed her master’s degree at the New England Conservatory of Music in 1980; concurrently, she studied painting at the School of the Museum of Fine Arts in Boston. She has had solo shows at the Monterey Museum of Art, the Fresno Museum of Art, and the Santa Cruz Museum of Art and History. In 2003, she was invited to exhibit at the Andy Warhol Museum in Medzilaborce, Slovak Republic, a project supported by artist’s grants from the US Department of State and the Ministry of Culture. She is also a recipient of an Artist’s Grant from the Community Foundation of the Monterey Peninsula. Her work is included in numerous museum collections including  Bakersfield Art Museum, Hunterdon Art Museum, and Santa Barbara Museum of Art.  
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Dan Addington is an artist, curator, and owner of Addington Gallery in Chicago. He has been working with wax since 1989 and exhibiting encaustic work professionally since 1992. His figurative mixed-media paintings have been featured in group and solo shows across the United Stated and are in numerous public and private collections. Dan's work incorporates materials such as fabric, oil, wax, tar, gold leaf and various printed matter. The accumulation and layering of these materials echoes his interest in history and the relationships between the stratification of cultures and the layering of memory.
Binnie Birstein is a painter known for her complex layering of images, energy lines and grids. Originally from New York City, Binnie has shown throughout the country, extensively in the Northeast, in many prestigious exhibitions, including the two museum incarnations of Swept Away: Translucence, Transparence, Transcendence In Contemporary Encaustic. Her work was included in R & F’s 2012 Encaustic Works, and will be included in Organic to Geometric: Investigations in Structure & Surface in 2015 at Endicott College, Beverly, Mass. A faculty member at Creative Arts Workshop as well as an instructor at the Center for Contemporary Printmaking. Binnie also offers private instruction from her studio in Norwalk, Connecticut.
Pamela Blum makes sculptures covered with encaustic paint. She has exhibited her work throughout the United States and in France. Her BA degree in studio art and art history is from the University of Pennsylvania, her MFA in Interrelated Media from Massachusetts College of Art and Design. She has just retired from 33 years of college-level teaching. In one of her specialties, color theory, she has a taught many students how colors push one another around like naughty children on a playground. Color theory is one of her specialties.
David A. Clark teaches encaustic printmaking across the United States, most recently at Idyllwild School for the Arts, Wax Works West, R&F Handmade Paints, and the Palm Springs Art Museum. His work is part of the permanent collections of the Hunterdon Art Museum, the Process Museum and many public and private collections, and his encaustic print work will soon be featured in the upcoming book, Encaustic, from Schiffer Publishing.
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Cat Crotchett is a professor in the Frostic School of Art at Western Michigan University in Kalamazoo. Her studio work focuses on encaustic painting characterized by layers of information; interweaving patterns painted in vibrant colors and textured surfaces. She has an extensive exhibition record including international and national solo exhibitions and invitational and juried shows. Cat is currently producing a body of work that combines the use of Indonesian batik tools and motifs, and encaustic painting.
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Dorothy Cochran is an accomplished printmaker who continues to push the boundaries of how to create works on paper.  With long time experience as an artist, educator and curator, she has developed innovative ways to work and layer wax substrates, creating prints of luminous quality. She holds an MFA from Columbia University, currently teaches at The Montclair Art Museum and conducts workshops throughout the United States. Her works are represented in museums, corporate and private collections and exhibited widely. 
A photographer and painter, Elena De La Ville has shown at the Museum of Contemporary Art, Sofia Imber in Caracas, Venezuela; the A Gallery on Martha’s Vineyard; and Selby Gallery in Sarasota, Florida. In 2011, she curated the exhibit, Wow: Women and Wax, at the Art Center Sarasota, which showcased the work of 10 well-known women artists from around the country. Her work is in the collection of the Museo de Arte Contemporaneo, Sofia Imber in Caracas; the Museo Acarigua, Araure, Venezuela, and many other private collections. Elena has photographed, taught and lived in many places, including London, Spain, France and in Boston. She resides in Sarasota, where she is on the faculty at Ringling College of Art and Design.
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Patricia Dusman, an award winning artist originally from New York City and now residing in Doylestown, Pennsylvania, studied printmaking and photography at Bard College. After a successful 20-year career in pharmaceutical research, she returned to pursue art making full time. She is currently focusing her work on encaustic painting and exploring working with wax in mixed media. She is also interested in safety issues within her encaustic painting practice. Her work can be found in private collections in the U.S.
Karen Freedman is a Pennsylvania artist recognized for her abstract geometric paintings that explore optical illusion and depth through the use of luminous encaustic paints. Karen began her formal training studying jewelry design at The University of the Arts in Philadelphia. She went on to build a successful graphic design business followed by her immersion in the fine arts. Karen has exhibited at venues that include Hunterdon Art Museum, the Cape Cod Museum of Art,  The State Museum of Pennsylvania, Art Center Sarasota, Castle Gallery at the College of New Rochelle, and the George Segal Gallery, Montclair State University. Her work is featured in Encaustic With a Textile Sensibility by Daniella Woolf and Encaustic Art (Art of the Century) by Jennifer Margell.
Richard Frumess has been manufacturing encaustic commercially since 1982. In 1988 he founded R&F Handmade Paints. For the last several years he has been developing a series of comprehensive tests on the properties of encaustic paint – its lightfastness, adhesiveness, aging, and characteristics of raw materials. Many of these tests have never been carried out on a systematic basis until now. Richard has been working in collaboration with industry experts, conservators, and materials scientists.
Milisa Galazzi's artwork highlights human relationships punctuated by physical distance or separation by time and she is best known for her large scale installations, works on paper, and conceptual paintings. Milisa holds an MA with Honors from the Rhode Island School of Design, were she researched the educational effectiveness of community-based art education settings, and her findings are published by Harvard University Graduate School of Education, Project Zero Press, 1999; in addition, she holds a BA from Brown University, where she studied Studio Art with minors in Women’s Studies and Cultural Anthropology—all of which directly inform the content of her art making. Milisa works full time in her studio in Providence and on Cape Cod in the summer months.
Lorraine Glessner holds an MFA in Fibers from Tyler School of Art, Temple University, where she is currently an Assistant Professor in the Fibers and Material Studies Department, and a BS in Textile Design from Philadelphia University. Recent awards include two artist fellowship grants in crafts  from the Pennsylvania Council on the Arts, as well as the Yvonne Kelly memorial award for mixed media from Abington Art Center. Her work is included in the recently released, Encaustic Works: Nuance, curated by Michelle Stuart and published by R&F Paints. She is represented by Kenise Barnes Fine Art, Larchmont, New York, and James Gallery, PittsburghLorraine lectures, teaches, and exhibits her work nationally and maintains a studio in Philadelphia.
Lynette Haggard holds a BFA in painting from Philadelphia College of Art. Her work been shown in over 70 exhibitions, and is included in the permanent collection of the New Britain Museum of Art as well as in private collections in the U.S. and abroad. She maintains her art practice in the Boston area, and has been a regular presenter at the conference since 2009. 
Ruth Hiller has been pushing the boundaries with encaustic since 2008. Geometry, nature and industrialization are key elements in her abstract paintings. Her work has been exhibited in galleries across the country and in 2014, she was the recipient of a month-long artist residency at The Golden Foundation. Ruth splits her time between Boulder, Colorado, and New York City.
Jeff Hirst is a San Francisco Bay Area-based artist who has been exhibiting his work since 1987 and has shown extensively across the United States and Europe. His work has been shown at The Minneapolis Institute of Arts, the McKinney Contemporary in Dallas, Butters Gallery in Portland, Oregon, and Arte Internazionale in Matera, Italy. Jeff teaches workshops at his Oakland printshop and at national venues.
Deborah Kapoor is best known for her unconventional, mixed media works and sculptural wall installations. Her work will be featured in the forthcoming book Encaustic by Ashley Rooney, with foreword by Kim Bernard. In 2013, she launched an extensive program of art classes in encaustic at Bellevue College in Bellevue, Washington. Deborah is represented by Conrad Wilde Gallery in Tucson, Arizona, and at ArtXchange Gallery in Seattle’s Pioneer Square. She earned her MFA from the University of Delaware and her BFA from the University of North Texas. Her home and studio are in Seattle.
Judy Klich captures beauty in her paintings by showing close-up details and scenery often missed by our busy lifestyles.  Her work juxtaposes nature with geometry and displays the connection between the two.  It reflects her need for balance in life by contrasting elements and creating harmony at the same time.  Judy is represented by Paul LeQuire and Company and Shimai Art and Pottery, both in Nashville; River Gallery, Chattanooga; and Lark and Key Gallery, Charlotte. She paints and teaches workshops at River Art Studio in Nashville, Tennessee.
Susan Lasch Krevitt builds two- and three-dimensional tactile abstractions. Her work explores structure, connection, strength and vulnerability, transforming cast off materials, most often textiles and encaustic. Susan’s work has been exhibited internationally in galleries and museums for over 30 years. In 2012 she won the Juror’s Award at the Seventh International Encaustic Conference. Susan received her BFA from the School of the Art Institute of Chicago and currently resides in Southern California.
Alexandre Masino's practice has been devoted to encaustic painting for the past 15 years. He is known for his painterly approach, both in painting and monotype, using representation in dialogue with a subtle and expressive use of the medium. His works have been presented in more then 50 solo and group exhibitions in public and commercial galleries across Canada, the United States and Europe. Alexandre regularly presents at the Conference and has also exhibited and taught at R&F Handmade Paints. You may follow his writings and news on his blog
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Sara Mast is a widely exhibited artist whose paintings are included in over 30 public and private collections in the United States and abroad. Her work is included in Joanne Mattera’s book, The Art of Encaustic Painting. Recent exhibitions include a collaborative exhibition at the Ucross Foundation in ClearmontWyoming; a solo exhibition at Rosenfeld Gallery in Philadelphia; and a group exhibition at Zolla/Lieberman Gallery in Chicago. Currently, she is working on a collaborative project with physicists entitled Black (W)hole, an art installation that was was recently included in  Encaustic Works: Nuance, curated by Michelle Stuart and published by R&F Handmade Paints. Sara lives and works in BozemanMontana, and co-chairs the Drawing & Painting department at Montana State University.
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A newly elected member of American Abstract Artists, Joanne Mattera is a gallery-represented painter who has shown widely since 1975. Her work is in the collections of the New Britain Museum of American Art, Connecticut; Montclair Art Museum, New Jersey; the U.S. State Department; and collections internationally. Her work is included in Geoform, an online curatorial project featuring geometric abstraction. She is the author of The Art of Encaustic Painting and the ongoing Joanne Mattera Art Blog. Joanne is a consulting editor to ProWax Journal and the founder/director of this Conference.
Marci Rae McDade is editor of the contemporary textile-arts quarterly, Surface Design Journal, and former editor of FiberArts magazine. In addition to her editorial pursuits, she is a mentor and instructor in the MFA Applied Craft + Design Program, co-sponsored by the Oregon College of Art and Craft and the Pacific Northwest College of Art, Portland, Oregon. Marci received an MFA in fiber and material studies from the School of the Art Institute of Chicago (2007), completed a Fiber Emerging Artist Residency at the Oregon College of Art and Craft (2007), and received a BA in film and video production from Columbia College Chicago (1993). As a practicing fiber artist, she has exhibited her embroidered art and multi-media fiber installations nationally in solo and group exhibitions since 2000.
Timothy McDowell received his MFA from the University of Arizona in 1981. Since then he has been a professor of printmaking and drawing at Connecticut College in New London, Connecticut
Over the years, he has concentrated on several mediums. For the last 20 he has worked primarily in encaustic as well as oils, producing paintings, prints and works on paper. His work has been exhibited nationally and internationally with representation in the U.S. and Canada. Collections include The Metropolitan Museum of Art Print and Drawing Collection, The University of Iowa Museum of Art, The New Mexico Museum of Art, the Tucson Museum of Art and others.
Raé  Miller is a mixed media artist living in San Miguel de Allende, Mexico. Her recent work addresses the illusion of time and place and the fallibility of a memory not anchored by "home". She was the recipient of a Scholarship Grant for the Seventh International Encaustic Conference, and a featured artist in the book Art in San Miguel by Al Tirado. She is at work on an exhibit of encaustic paintings on paper for Museo de la Ciudad in Queretaro, Mexico. In 2010, she opened Raé Miller Studio/Gallery in Fabrica La Aurora, a former textile mill turned arts center. She teaches 20 workshops per year in her studio. Raé’s work is in private collections in the United States, the Caribbean, Mexico, Canada, Europe and Dubai.
Cherie Mittenthal has her MFA from the State University of New York at Purchase and her BFA from the Hartford Art School at the University of Hartford. She is the Executive Director of Truro Center for the Arts at Castle Hill since 2002. Cherie serves on the board of Campus Provincetown, Provincetown Cultural Council, and partners with Highlands Center Inc. for the only Wood-Fired Kiln on Cape Cod. Cherie’s paintings and work on paper are redolent of the meeting of sky, sand and sea, and sometimes animals from crows, to pigs and sheep. In her studio practice she works in pigment sticks, mixed media and encaustic. Her work is represented by Kobalt Gallery in Provincetown. She is the co-producer of the International Encaustic Conference in Provincetown.
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Wayne Montecalvo is an artist whose range of works include mixed-media prints, paintings, sculpture, video and collaborative performance. Wayne received a BFA in Sculpture from the School of Visual Arts. Honors include residencies at the Frans Masereel Center in Belgium, the Vermont Studio Center, Women’s Studio Workshop and the John Michael Kohler Arts in Industry Program..
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Laura Moriarty makes prints, sculptural paintings and installations that resonate with the geologic. Laura’s honors include two grants from the Pollock-Krasner Foundation and participation in numerous artist residencies, including The Frans Masereel Center in Belgium, and the Ucross Foundation in Wyoming. She was the exhibition and workshop director at R&F Handmade Paints from 2003-2013. Recent exhibition venues include OK Harris Works of Art and IPCNY, both in New York City, The Handwerker Gallery at Ithaca College, and The Jyväskylä Art Museum in Finland. She is the author of Table of Contents, an artist’s book published in 2012.
Carol Pelletier is the Chair of Fine Arts and Professor of Art at Endicott College, Beverly, Mass.  Her previous posts have included Chair of Visual Arts at West Virginia Wesleyan College and Visual Arts Master Teacher at the Governors School for the Arts at Marshall University. Carol has worked on multiple artist’s invitational and curatorial projects including Organic to Geometric: Investigations in Surface and Structure at Endicott College. She has exhibited in over 50 solo and group shows nationwide, including  the Attleboro Art Museum and the Huntington Museum of Art. She has received three National Endowment for the Arts Grants, a Mellon Foundation grant, and is a Salzburg Fellow. Her work has been in multiple catalogue exhibitions and publications including the New American Paintings. She is represented by the River Gallery in Chattanooga, Tennessee, and Cynthia Winings Gallery in Blue Hill, Maine.
Sherrie Posternak chooses whatever medium or technique is most appropriate to express her ideas—encaustic, photography, printmaking, video, collage, assemblage, mosaic, paper, fiber, metals, wood, ceramic, glass.  Sherrie began her encaustic practice 10 years ago and has had solo and group shows in the U.S. and Mexico. She has taught workshops in beginning, intermediate and advanced encaustic processes. She self-published a catalogue on the topic of her art installation, A Memorial for El Tomate. Images of Sherrie’s work are in the gallery section of Contemporary Paper and Encaustic by Catherine Nash.
Lisa Pressman is represented by Causey Contemporary in New York City, and has a solo show planned there for November 2015. She also will be exhibiting at R&F Handmade Paints, Kingston, New York; Butters Gallery, Portland, Oregon; and Telluride Gallery of Fine Art I Colorado.  In 2014, she exhibited her work in Mapping a Place, a solo show, at Susan Eley Fine Arts, New York City. Lisa has an MFA from Bard College. She lives and works in West Orange, New Jersey, and currently  teaches painting locally, nationally and internationally.
Paula Rolands extensive exhibition and teaching dates to the early 1980s and spans the United States and abroad. Awards and commissions include ones from the National Endowment for the Arts and U.S. Department of State, American Embassies in Johannesburg, South Africa, and Kampala, Uganda. Paula was recently featured in Surface Design News, Artist’s Magazine, and The Santa Fean. Her works and processes are included in several books and media, including Joanne Mattera’s The Art of Encaustic Painting. Paula’s DVD, Encaustic Monotypes: Painterly Prints With Heat and Wax, has sold over 1000 copies.  
Joan Stuart Ross is an established artist and teacher in the Pacific Northwest. Joan was born in Boston and educated at Boston Latin School, Connecticut College, Yale, and Universities of Iowa and Washington. Recent exhibitions: International Women's Art Festival, Seoul, Korea; Kent Centennial Gallery and Moses Lake Museum, Washington; and solo show at RiverSea Gallery, Astoria, Oregon. Residencies include: Pilchuck, Centrum and Espy Foundations, Balestrand Kunstlag, and Playa. Joan is a founding board member of Seattle Print Arts and partner of BallardWorks, artists’ workspace building in Seattle. She maintains her studios there and in Nahcotta, Washington.
Toby Sisson earned her MFA from the University of Minnesota, Twin Cities, and is an Assistant Professor of Studio Art and Director of the Schiltkamp Gallery at Clark University in Worcester, Massachusetts. In addition to her individual works in painting and printmaking, Toby’s areas of specialization include collaborative public art and community-based service learning. She has been the recipient of numerous awards and grants for her studio practice as well as excellence in teaching. Among her academic research projects, she studies the development of dialogic critique methods for students and professional artists. She currently lives and works in Providence, Rhode Island.
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Tracy Spadafora is a painter who teaches studio art classes at colleges and museums in the Boston / Worcester area, and in her studio in Westborough, Mass.  She has given workshops and demonstrations in the technique of encaustic at locations throughout the northeast for the past 17 years. Tracy’s artwork has been exhibited across the U.S. and is included in the collections of Harvard University, the Danforth Museum, and Bank of America.  Her work has also been included in numerous publications, and most recently in the May 2014 issue of Artist’s Magazine.
Pat Spainhour is a contemporary painter-printmaker, currently teaching AP Art History at the University of North Carolina School of the Arts. She earned a BFA degree from the University of North Carolina at Greensboro and has 34 years of experience teaching studio art and art history. Pat studied encaustic painting with Tremain Smith in 2006 and Paula Roland in 2009. Her art is held in several collections and exhibited internationally.
Deborah Winiarski teaches a mixed-media class and the encaustic workshops at The Art Students League of New York in Manhattan. Her work has been exhibited at Denise Bibro Fine Art—in 2014, Waxing—and at Kouros Gallery, both in New York City, and at various venues across the United States, including Far and Wide, The 6th Annual Woodstock Regional at the Woodstock Artists Association and Museum. She was a resident artist at The Studios of Key West. Deborah is Featured Artworks Editor for ProWax Journal, a quarterly online publication for professional artists working in the medium of encaustic.  Her work is represented by Broadhurst Gallery, Pinehurst, North Carolina
Gregory Wright creates aquatic, cosmic, and microscopic fantasy worlds in his paintings that incorporate mixed media embellishments with encaustic. He is an exuberant presenter and instructor who brings his enthusiasm and innovative techniques to this year’s Conference presentations and workshops. Gregory exhibits nationally. In September 2015, Essence of Reaction at Galatea Fine Art, Boston, will signify his third solo exhibition at the gallery. Gregory exhibited in Swept Away: Translucence, Transparence, Transcendence in Contemporary Encaustic at the Hunterdon Museum in Clinton, New Jersey.  He was part of R& F Handmade Paints Visiting Artist Series, where he taught and had a solo exhibition in the gallery in August 2013. He was one of the selected artists in Encaustic Works 2012, juried by Joanne Mattera.